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James Ahrens

James Ahrens

Los Alamos National Lab

Dr. James Ahrens of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is the founder and design lead of ParaView, a widely adopted visualization and data analysis package for large-scale scientific simulation data. ParaView has had an extremely positive impact on the large-scale data analytic capabilities available to simulation scientists around the world. Dr. Ahrens graduated in 1996 with a Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Washington. Following his graduate studies, he joined LANL as a technical staff member. At Los Alamos, he is the leader of an awesome data analysis and visualization team of twenty staff, postdocs and students, as well as a national leader of programmatic initiatives important to the Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program and the Office of Science (SC) Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) programs.

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David Rogers

David Rogers

Los Alamos National Lab

David Honegger Rogers joined LANL in 2013, after a decade of leading the Scalable Analysis and Visualization Team at Sandia National Labs, where he was instrumental in bringing in-situ analysis and visualization into production. He now focuses on interactive web-based analysis tools that integrate design, scalable analytics and principles of cognitive science to promote scientific discovery. Prior to working on large scale data analysis, David worked at DreamWorks Feature animation, writing and managing production software. He has degrees in Computer Science, Architecture (buildings, not computers), and an MFA in Writing for Children.

 

Jonathan Woodring

Jonathan Woodring

Los Alamos National Lab

Jon joined the Los Alamos National Lab as a staff member in 2009. He recieved B.S., M.S. and Ph.D.’s in Computer Science from The Ohio State University. His experience includes visualization, data science, scientific computing, and high-performance computing.

Wu-Chun Feng

Wu-Chun Feng

Virginia Tech

Wu-Chun (Wu) Feng is the Elizabeth & James E. Turner Fellow & Professor in the Department of Computer Science, Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, and Virginia Bioinformatics Institute at Virginia Tech. His interests lie broadly at the synergistic intersection of computer architecture, systems software and middleware, and applications software. Most recently, his research has dealt with high-performance networking protocols, dynamic multicore scheduling, accelerator-based computing for bioinformatics, virtual computing, power-aware computing, and bioinformatics in general. He joined Virginia Tech in 2006 after spending seven years at Los Alamos National Laboratory. He is the recipient of three Best Paper Awards in human-computer interaction, high-performance networking, and bioinformatics, respectively, and three R&D 100 Awards in green supercomputing, high-speed networking, and bioinformatics, respectively. He leads the SyNeRGy Laboratory as well as four grass roots projects: The Green500 List, mpiBLAST, Supercomputing in Small Spaces, and MyVICE.

Vignesh Adhinarayanan

Vignesh Adhinarayanan

Virginia Tech

Vignesh Adhinarayanan is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Computer Science at Virginia Tech with Prof. Wu-chun Feng. He is a member of the SyNeRGy Lab working on Green Computing. He is working on developing power models and optimization techniques for Graphics Processing Units. Previously, he worked at Waran Research Foundation (WARFT) as an undergraduate research trainee in the area of heterogeneous computing. He is interested in the broad areas of green computing (energy-efficient computing), parallel computing, and hetergeneous computer architectures.

Colin Ware

Colin Ware

University of New Hampshire

Colin Ware is the Director of the Data Visualization Research Lab which is part of the Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping at the University of New Hampshire. He is cross appointed between the Departments of Ocean Engineering and Computer Science. Ware specializes in advanced data visualization and has a special interest in applications of visualization to Ocean Mapping. He combines interests in both basic and applied research and he has advanced degrees in both computer science (MMath, Waterloo) and in the psychology of perception (Ph.D.,Toronto). Ware has published over 150 articles in scientific and technical journals and leading conference proceedings. Many of these articles relate to the use of color, texture, motion and 3D displays in information visualization. His approach is always to combine theory with practice and his publications range from rigorously scientific contributions to the Journal of Physiology and Vision Research to applications-oriented articles in ACM Transactions on Graphics and various visualization and human-computer Interaction Journals. Ware likes to build useful visualization systems. A founding member of the Ocean Mapping Group at the University of New Brunswick (and lately the Ocean Mapping Center at UNH), he has been designing 3D interactive visualization systems for ocean mapping for about 25 years. He and his graduate students created the first version of the Fledermaus visualization system, now widely used in Oceanographic applications. Ware has also contributed to software system visualization. He directed the development of NestedVision3D, a system for visualizing very large networks of information. Ware has been instrumental in the creation of two spinoff visualization companies based initially on his research. Interactive Visualization Systems, Inc. makes visualization software for advanced ocean mapping applications. NVision Software Systems, Inc. provided visualization tools to enhance the understanding of large highly interconnected datasets. He is currently working on a variety of projects including ocean current visualization, the visualization of marine mammal tracks, and more theoretically, visual thinking algorithms. Colin Ware has written two books: Visual Thinking for Design is an up to date account of the psychology of how we think using graphic displays as tools. Information Visualization: Perception for Design, now in its 3rd edition, is a comprehensive survey of what human perception tells us about how to display information.

Francesca Samsel

Francesca Samsel

University of Texas at Austin

Francesca’s work balances on the fulcrum between art and science. Activity immersed in collaborations with scientists and computer visualization specialists, she has seeks to meld scientific factual understanding with artistic distillation and metaphor. Using the combined language, she seeks to present the environmental issues of our time in an approachable digestible form to a wide range of audiences. The bulk of her work day is spent with the Research Visualization Team at Los Alamos National Labs. Using her expertise in color and communication, the non-numerical kind, they are involved in a long-term collaboration to improve the visualization tools to help scientists gain deeper understanding from data and research.

Greg Abram

Greg Abram

University of Texas at Austin

Greg Abram is a visualization researcher at the Texas Advanced Computing Center, a research division of the University of Texas at Austin. Prior to joining TACC, he was at the IBM TJ Watson Research Center. He received his Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1986.

 

Terece L. Turton

Terece L. Turton

University of Texas at Austin

Terece L. Turton is a Research Associate at the University of Texas at Austin, in the Center for Agile Technology. She received her Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Michigan and did postdoctoral work at the Superconducting Super Collider, Michgan State University, and the University of Cincinnati. Her current work focuses on perceptual user evaluation in scientific visualization and includes the Evaluation Toolkit, www.etklab.org, an open-source repository of modules to automate image-based perceptual experiments.

 

Roxana Bujack

Roxana Bujack

Staff Scientist, Los Alamos National Laboratory

Dr. Roxana Bujack is a staff scientist in the Data Science at Scale Team at Los Alamos National Laboratory since July 2016. She graduated in mathematics and computer science and received her PhD in the Image and Signal Processing Group at Leipzig University. Then, Roxana worked as a postdoctoral researcher at IDAV at the University of California, Davis and at the Computer Graphics and HCI Group at the Technical University Kaiserslautern. Her research interests include visualization, pattern recognition, vector fields, moment invariants, high performance computing, massive data analysis, Lagrangian flow representations, and Clifford analysis.

 

Anne Berres

Anne Berres

Los Alamos National Laboratory (formally)

Dr. Anne Berres received a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Kaiserslautern, Germany in 2015. Her core expertise lies in various aspects of visual computing, most notably in-situ visualization, image processing, and geometry. As a Postdoctoral Researcher at Los Alamos National Laboratory (2015-2017), she conducted sampling and compression of large-scale simulation data, and developed climate simulations in an HPC environment. She is currently a Postdoctoral Researcher at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, where she applies her skills to image-based deep learning on architecturally diverse HPC machines, and web-based visualization and analysis for geographic data.